This is the place to air your views on TEFL issues in Thailand. Most topics are welcome but please use common sense at all times. Please note that not all submissions will be used, particularly if the post is just a one or two sentence comment about a previous entry.

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The native speaker myth

The native speaker myth

One should understand that language acquisition is a skill which has to be taught by people who are skilled. It doesn't matter which nationality or color one appears with. The native speaker myth as believed and promoted by many academics around Thailand is that only a certain tribe of people from selected countries can or should teach English. The truth is that there are no real native speaker who know the language any more in this earth simply because what language is taught in the classroom and in prescribed text books are not used by common people in those countries.
English is not a language owned by any country and for that matter it is spoken (communicated) appropriately by a larger population of people in countries other than those mentioned as native speaker countries namely U K , U S, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. In simple words more people speak English outside these countries that all the countries put together.

The main reason for the widespread need to learn the English Language arose due to the advent of the computer, where in programs are written with English text and words. Many folk have much to gain by using unskilled workers to teach English so as to weaken the abilities of a larger population of learners, this in turn will enhance the population of low wage laborers, flesh traders and host of other professions that require very little or no knowledge of a foreign language. The native speaker myth looms over the downfall of the language acquisition abilities of poor innocent Thais. Simply coz the folks in charge want to earn a quick buck and con as many people into believing that they can learn best from someone who was born with the language spoken all around him/ her.

I am a native speaker myself but would not come out front and speak out loud to disturb my bosses or the financiers coz teaching English is what brings food to my stomach. I do however want to create an awareness that would enlighten the educated folk and academics into selecting people who are interested in teaching and not just people who need a job so they can hang around the country for fun( no offense to whom it may disturb but one cannot be a computer programmer if one has not been taught or trained to). To take appropriate steps to make sure that the selected people are genuinely interested in teaching and enhancing the abilities of the local children.
All the best to those desiring to live and work as teacher in the land of smiles.

Y. Coarter


Thai English teachers

I teach at a large government school. The students tell me their Thai teacher doesn't ever speak to them in English, even when their lesson is English. After being at this school for a while, I've noticed that very few know enough English to even say, " good morning."

I was told, not asked, to participate in the English Club every Friday. The teacher over it is of course a Thai that literally slaughters the English language. At the first meeting, she said a total of six words in English. I counted every one. At the second meeting last Friday, she said a total of thirteen words in English. Last weekend, we had "open house". While the other foreign teachers were there, several of us were taking to the director of the English Department and she ask us for ideas on how to improve it. I told her, "for a start, make the teachers and students speak English when they come in the office." One of the other teachers agreed and told her, "this is the English Department, so the students need to speak English when they come in." Another teacher agreed and basically said the same thing. The director said, "I am going to implement that." You must understand, she barely speaks enough English to be coherent herself. Anyway, the very next morning, six students came into the office to talk to the teacher over the English Club, who sits beside me, not one word was spoken in English. The director was also in the office and joined in the conversation with the students. In Thai of course.

Later that morning, I went to my class and all my students were gone. I ask a student teacher passing by, "do you know where my students are?" She told me, " they are watching a cartoon in the Assembly Building. I said, "a cartoon?" She said, "yes, about Bangkok, it's kind of like a game show." Of course it was in Thai. I went back to my office and the director was there. I told her, "it's no wonder why Thai students can't speak English." She said, oh?" I told her, "until schools get serious about learning English, the students will always speak pigeon English or no English at all." She just shrugged her shoulders.

I do not understand how the students learn any English at all.

Ralph


Black American teachers in Thailand

Black American teachers in Thailand

Let me start off by saying that I am not a black teacher in Thailand. However, I am a black male in my early 30's who recently returned from vacation in Bangkok, Pattaya and Ko Samet about 2 1/2 weeks ago; it was my first trip out of the States. I also want it to be known that I am a college graduate with a degree in English and journalism from Western Michigan University. Currently, I live in Los Angeles and I am a talent executive for a major cable network.

Though I have not been, nor am I black teacher in Thailand, I felt compelled to e-mail you my two cents after reading the disheartening, but honest e-mails from some Black Americans teachers in Thailand. Overall, my experience in Thailand was a positive one. I felt most of the Thai people were very friendly at restaurants and other business establishments, except at one of the money exchange centers near my hotel in Bangkok who was completely rude and barley looked at me, if at all.

Throughout my travels I did very much get stared at. Heads often turned as I walked down the street. When I was in Ko Samet I definitely felt the hesitation and/or fear of dealing with me by some of the Thai people, even at restaurants. I went with a group of mostly white men and one half Taiwanese friend and felt they were paid attention to more than I was, but that happens here in the U.S. as well. I met a young Thai female who told our native Thai friend that she had never met a Black American before. I wasn't that surprised. Clearly, I was the fish out of water and truly felt it, but I was also completely fine with it.

Needless to say, I had an amazing time in Thailand and definitely would return. I stumbled upon your blog because I was looking for teaching programs in Thailand. I have decided that I too would like to broaden my horizons and teach in Thailand so I thought, until I read the various blogs from former black teachers. I must say, I have more than a little trepidation about teaching in Thailand, as I certainly do not want the added stress of prejudice and discrimination when I'm in another country, which is already stressful enough. I am fully aware that the perceptions, stereotypes and flat out racism reach far beyond North America. We as Black Americans can not escape our badge of color; we will live with it through sickness and health, 'till death do us part.

If there is someone out there who could shed a little more light on their experiences teaching in Thailand or another country I would greatly appreciate it, as I do not want someone else's experience to turn me away from pursuing such a rewarding, life changing opportunity and journey across continents.

Evan Majors


A great opportunity

A great opportunity

Teaching in Thailand is a great opportunity and market to all Filipinos who desired to venture here in order to alleviate the family's condition in the Philippines. Needless to say, we all came here for the sole purpose and that is to earn more and save for the future and family. But recently, I heard lots of rumors about Filipinos here who worked with the salary below the waist like 10,000 baht/month and worst 8,000 baht without free accommodation and food. But when I tried to ask them why they took the job, the reply is simply NO CHOICE than nothing. Some of my friends who worked for 2 years in the same school and earned 20,000 baht/month were fired because here comes these neophytes who themselves offered to the school director that 8,000 baht/month is enough for them. What a crab instinct! Pathetic! But it's the reality.

I always heard comments that we are better than those with white skin and blue eyes, more qualified and more industrious. Why won't we use these propagandas to ask for a better and higher pay? As for me, it's not a matter of no choice. We always have the choice to say NO and look for somewhere else better. Thai schools nowadays have opened their eyes towards the capacity and fluency of Filipinos in terms of English language than before. This I say to remind you of our purpose of coming here. How can we help our family and future if we earn less than we earn in our country? We always have the choice. To put a price on ourselves and believe that we deserve this pay because we deserve the job and we can do it! Our luck here in Thailand depends on how we look into ourselves. I can say this from my heart because I met this kind of situation, and I fought for it and won, and I have proven to myself that we can get what we want if we only believe in ourselves. Lastly, we must stop our bad attitude such as the crab mentality. It won't make us prosper...Thanks and mabuhay sa lahat!

Rey Murillo


More time studying please

More time studying please

I have just finished trolling through some of the comments about ageism in the TEFL arena, as well as other topics in your teacher info section, which I think is a great idea because it gives everyone a chance to air their opinions regardless of race, age, religion or any other defect your readers can think of.
My reason for writing is two fold; first, the number of people who claim to be English teachers that cannot write so much as one short paragraph without making spelling and/or grammar mistakes. Any person who has had a good education and who takes a pride in their linguistic abilities should be able to write one short paragraph without a single mistake, or at least check it with the grammar and spell check tool on their computer. These are the same people that shout and scream about the poor conditions that 'farang teachers' have to endure in order to survive in Thailand, I would suggest that they spend less time complaining and more time studying the English language, at which they claim to be expert enough to be able to call themselves 'teachers', they are a disgrace to the profession.

Second, having read the comments in the Filipino section, most of which boasted that the Filipinos are as good at teaching the English language as any 'native speaker', I was again aroused at the temerity of these people. I recently had the distasteful job of checking the English exam papers (where I work) for spelling and grammar mistakes, all had been prepared by Filipino teachers (I use the term 'teachers' loosely) and was appalled at the number of spelling, grammar and vocabulary mistakes that had been made. I gave the teachers in question the benefit of the doubt and assumed they were probably genuine mistakes, but when I pointed the mistakes out they all showed their true colours and arrogantly insisted that I was wrong. The matter was resolved when I handed them a copy of the Oxford English Dictionary and a copy of the Oxford book of grammar and told them to check their work again, then come back and apologise.
As an aside, I have a Masters in English Literature, as well as two other degrees and I am very proud of my profession.

Brian


Don't take racism seriously

Don't take racism seriously

I am a Black American ex-pat (African-American? I'm not African, dude). I do not teach in Thailand, because I work in the Middle East. However, Thailand is like a third home. Yes, racism exists everywhere and in many different ways. However, there is one thing Americans need to know and this applies to every country where they are an ex-pat. If you choose to work in a foreign country, this means that you are going to have to adapt to the foreign country (values, morals, culture and non-existent civil rights). It's not your country, you cannot expect or change it to be like your country, and you cannot enforce this country to immediately embrace your American values...unless you're a multi-billion dollar conglomerate or fascist military. You can only enlighten some people and let them take it from there. Yeah, Thailand can be racist and racism is ignorance, but obviously it's not bad enough to make you go back to Uncle Sam.

Whether in the Middle East or Southeast Asia, my fellow Americans have made an art of bringing self-inflicted headache and drama overseas. Try to avoid it...or what are you doing overseas in the first place? However, this is a good discussion forum. In a world where almost everyone wants to be White (except for rebellious Japanese youth) Black people will always need a place to vent. When African-Americans go to Africa, they leave the 'African' at home - Anonymous

F.Gibbs


Confusion reigns

Confusion reigns

I have just completed the Thai Culture course and I am at present waiting for the Teacher Council of Thailand to make a decision as to when and where there will be courses run covering the four modules of the test, which is the next step toward obtaining a teaching license. I have now been told that due to the fact that there will be a staff reshuffle within the Teacher Council, this is supposed to take place in May of this year, all decision making regarding any arrangements concerning courses, tests or any other business pertaining to the new licensing laws have been postponed, until after the reshuffle.

The point I am leading up to is this, everyone on the course run by Rangsit university were told they had one year to obtain the new license, which effectively meant that everyone who wanted to continue teaching would have to move up into top gear and start preparing themselves for the 27-hour course and home study, which is virtually compulsory if you want to stand a chance of passing the test. Consequently, those of us who did the course in March 2008 only have until March 2009 to comply with the new regulations. But, the council have put everything on hold until May, which means that those of us who attended the course in March are going to be held up from doing any studying for at least 2 or more months.

It was made very clear to all of us that it would take about a year to complete the 27-hour course with as much home studying as one could manage in order to pass the test, but now I am being told by a council official that I cannot do anything to prepare myself until at least May or June or God knows when, which means that I am being penalized for something that I have absolutely no control over.
How the hell is anybody supposed to do in ten months, or less, something that actually takes twelve months?

Tired and confused


Filipino scam

Filipino scam

The new academic year is approaching again and many teachers are flocking to the country to find their chance of getting employed in their profession. However, I heard about a certain kind of scam on October last year about a certain recruiter of teachers from the Philippines. This might expose the Filipinos to another bad image again, but it might even be worst if more fellow, poor, Filipino teachers will be losing their hard-borrowed or loaned (not earned) money to such unscrupulous people. It took me months to think about this, and balance the situation, before I finally decided to inform Ajarn. What this person allegedly did was to contact more that 20 teachers and required each one to pay 50,000 pesos (about 41,000 baht) for a guaranteed teaching job here in Thailand. I'm not sure if this included the air fare or not, although I strongly suspect that it did not. Apartment rent along with food allowance were not also included. So these poor teachers had to bring additional money that will sustain them until they will be lucky enough to find their employers. If when, only God knows.

On arriving here, this recruiter started bringing this platoon of teachers to the different advertised teaching agencies and schools. Of course each one had to undergo interviews along with other normal procedures that should be done when a teacher applies for a teaching position, which was contrary to what the recruiter promised. It was supposed to be a GUARANTEED WAITING TEACHING JOB. The recruiter also applied and had to undergo interview himself/herself (not sure if it’s a male or a female). The group was just lucky enough to find a newly opened school needing more than twenty teachers, and so they were all hired. Well at least, just for that semester. I just hope that these already got their job contract for the next academic year. Otherwise, you know what I mean.

I tried informing one of the TV stations in the Philippines about this but I still got no reply from them, nor any acknowledgement that they received the information. To my Kababayans, please find ways to inform everyone back home about this scam, and if possible help in the arrest of this/these person/persons, to stop it from becoming an organized scam.

Thai Ilfil


Xenophobia

Xenophobia

I've noticed a prevailing difference in attitudes toward fallang depending on where you're at (in respects to both location and social standing). But one theme that often surfaces in Thai media is their subtle attacks upon anything fallang. Positive comments are made 'tongue in cheek' at best. I am fairly fluent in Thai and often watch Big Cinema movies budded in Thai by Thai translators and am both amazed and perplexed at their deliberate attempt to cast a dark shadow upon Western culture. The translation is occasionally slighted to make us look bad. Last year some fallang pop stars came to Thailand and there was a live interview and the pop stars were cordial in saying that they liked Thai culture and food, but the Thai interpreter added that they really like Thai girls. The pop stars never said that.

Recently there was a talk show on Thai TV about why Thai woman marry fallang. The audience were university students and they had this 'so-called' expert on Thai-fallang relations on the panel making outlandish comments about the dangers of marrying a fallang. He said some fallang force their wives into prostitution to get money. The girls in the audience were horrified. The panel concluded that Thai woman marry fallang so they can take care of their family. Little emphasis was made on the fact that some couples seek to have a real, loving and meaningful relationship.

In short, Thais are jealous of fallang and so they try to cut us down with negative comments and media in general

Ajaran Fallang


What's a native speaker?

What's a native speaker?

Many jobs I read on ajarn.com request native speakers, i.e. people from English speaking countries. However, I have lived in the UK for the last 25 years and have good command of the English language, originally from Holland. I have studied in the UK, been to college, polytechnic, and I worked there. Since 1987 I taught at a further education college, though not English, but computer literacy. What I am trying to point out, you can have people from a native speaking country and from a region thereof with a very strong dialect.

In England, take a Cockney, someone from Yorkshire or Newcastle. No criticism against people from those areas. But people in other countries will find it hard to understand them, or ask someone from Glasgow or Northern Ireland to teach here if they speak with their local accents. The students will be totally lost. When I lived in England (before moving to Scotland), I knew many people from those areas, and with time you learn slowly to understand a little what is being said. When I lived in Scotland, I had plenty of friends who originally came from Glasgow.

Personally I love the English language, it has got a rich source of literature. I think that people from non English speaking countries who have spent such a long time in an English speaking country are very capable of making themselves understood. Of course, one must not speak in the local accent of the area where one has lived. I lived in Birmingham, England, and started to pick up the local accent. No, it is not a rant and rave, or even a moan, just a general statement, and trying to find out what is really a native speaker.


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