This is the place to air your views on TEFL issues in Thailand. Most topics are welcome but please use common sense at all times. Please note that not all submissions will be used, particularly if the post is just a one or two sentence comment about a previous entry.

Send your letter to Ajarn.com

To:
ajarn.com

You're in Thailand, not Europe

I am currently not working as a teacher in Bangkok, but what often strikes me is that many people claim that one needs the equivalent of a European salary to live a decent life in Krung Thep.

Besides being of the opinion that one can do with much less than 70,000 per month, teaching a common foreign language while making almost three times what the locals make strikes me as odd. Working for a Thai school and making 70,000 baht a month, good luck with that. The international school route is a much better bet.

I had a blast in Bangkok, made 40-45,000 as a non-native speaker, but packed my bags after almost two years. I miss Thailand everyday, but I think I made the right choice.

Tom


Are the sixty and over set out of luck as far as teaching?

Are the sixty and over set out of luck as far as teaching?

I have a Masters Degree from an American "University" and some part-time teaching experience on the college level but I was just doing that for extra money. Now I am retired in Thailand. I am 69 and still seem to have all my marbles. Are there ANY options, even part time to teach and earn a few hundred baht for incidentals? I have a good pension from the United States, but i am trying to help out my ailing mother-in-law, while also paying off credit card bills from the USA. No lectures about "financial responsibility" needed, I am hard enough on myself. Just exploring whatever options I may have. (Probably none, but it does not hurt to ask). Please omit the usual comments about what a "geezer" like me should be doing and how I should do it. Thank you very much.

Fred Azbell, Chonburi, Thailand


First impressions count!

We've recently advertised vacancies we have at my school.

I would suggest that job-seekers apply their alleged skills in English to that initial contact email and try to show themselves in the best light possible. I have been stunned by the generally poor quality of application emails sent. Surely people must realise that the very first point of contact with a potential new employer is the email? Forwarded content, the word 'Hi' with a grainy picture and a out-of-date document, awful grammar and self-inflated egos (without proof) don't really cut it.

Perhaps prospective employees should concentrate more on that first email, which might result in fewer rejections.

Johnnie


We should know what agencies earn

We should know what agencies earn

I disagree with the claim that teachers should not care what the agencies are making. The whole reason these agencies exist in Thailand with the current structures they do (a monthly percentage of a teacher's contract), unlike places like Japan and Korea and other related industries, such as international education wherein agencies will only charge a placement fee, is because of the corruption in the education system in Thailand.

There should indeed be transparency and accountability as to where and who this education budget goes to. This is tax money. If Thailand wants to hire and retain good teachers and come even close to the education quality of other countries, they need to do away with this corrupt practice.

Agencies should only be earning a placement fee. This placement fee should be publicized for the Thai public to see. These budgets should be audited by the Thai government to ensure these budgets are going where they were intended. "Kickbacks" and "nonations" to school administration will only continue to hurt social mobility of the Thai middle and working classes who cannot afford private education.

Brian


'Business casual' is the new trend

I have noticed over the past five to ten years a shift from the “semi-formal” attire to mostly the business casual look for male professionals here in Thailand, with the full suit and tie look reserved for top executives and the occasional formal occasion. It seems like we have been following the US West Coast trends.

I prefer this trend myself, as I think it is much easier to look smart wearing business casual clothing (slacks, professional shined shoes and either a button-down short- sleeve or Polo-style shirt) than the old-fashioned semi-formal look of a long-sleeved shirt with a tie. It is also more comfortable. Take a walk down the business district of Bangkok during working hours and see how many men are wearing long sleeved shirts and ties. Not many, although it was the look of 10 to 20 years ago.

I personally prefer the business casual look, it looks more confident, but still professional enough to set one apart from the common tourist.

Personal opinion, while a man can look very professional and smart wearing a full suit and tie it needs to be worn in the right situation, the semi-formal old fashioned long sleeve often white shirt with a tie without a jacket looks pretty dorky on most men, although some can pull it off with style.

I am not sure what is necessarily expected at government schools, but I suspect most language schools and other places operating outside official government regulations are comfortable with male teachers wearing clothes of a business casual style, which in my view is both more comfortable and looks smarter.

But of course, this is just opinion, there does seem to be some national differences with some of the English (British) teachers generally preferring the old-fashioned semi-formal look while many American teachers preferring a less formal look, with Canadian, Aussie, Kiwi and other foreign teachers being split on these opinions.

Just an observation.

Jack


Keeping hold of good teachers and other reflections on the education system

Keeping hold of good teachers and other reflections on the education system

At private schools money talks. Bigger classes is more money. To reduce the class sizes the fees will go up to international school standards I'm afraid.

Schools also don't need to hire teachers with a teaching degree. I was amazed to see so many colleagues with no teaching background whatsoever. Some of them are really good by the way. On the other hand I see teachers with a bachelor in education or higher with no teaching skills.

In government schools you have, on paper, qualified teachers but in many cases they don't have the motivation to make a difference. Many didn't choose education because they love it.

I agree that many lessons that I have seen are grammar-based (Thai and Filipino). Not saying it is wrong, but it is not my way. On the other hand there are a lot of teachers that come through agencies and are not staying longer than a year (sometimes two). That way you can't build consistency. Yes, if management is amazing it is probably possible. But in general, new teachers have to find things that work and don't work by themselves again.

To keep teachers longer will be hard. The demand of good teachers is high and many native English teachers will go to international schools. Even good non-native speakers go to international schools. What is left are many teachers, but nowhere near enough to fill schools with middle-class children.

Also the communication to parents is something I obviously agree on. I work at a school where 95 % of the parents speak at least basic English and are all on LINE. Also they are open to talk to you after school. In my previous school, half of the parents could speak English but many of the kids lived with grandparents. They didn't speak English and were not that engaged. It was more difficult to reach these (grand) parents.

In my opinion the biggest step forwards that Thai education could make is improving the teachers. I know that the government spends a lot of money to improve teachers. At the moment this money goes to trips around the country with no benefit to the schools whatsoever. Also colleges get a lot of money for buying equipment, but most of that money goes in people's pockets I'm afraid.

I hope the government could change this somehow. Also monitoring schools is based on documentation rather than (classroom) observations. I think there is enough room for improvement here. Whilst not seeing the whole picture, I think this is the first thing to change.

Knowing that my English isn't perfect (non-native English speaker here) I hope that my reply will be commented on content rather than its grammar and spelling.

Martin


Where do you find teaching jobs without a BA.

I taught for seven years at a post educational college in the UK and spent two years studying for the City & Guilds 7302 diploma in delivering learning. This was enough for my TESOL provider to enable me to sit their course which I completed earlier this year. All jobs on the Ajarn site require a BA minimum requirement. I have applied to several of them with the majority replying, sorry we cannot consider you for the post advertised as they would not be able to apply for a work permit without a BA, and then pointing out it is illegal to work in Thailand without the permit. Any suggestions welcome as to where the non BA jobs can be found.

David, Bangkok


I wish I had a teaching assistant

Re: "Let's hear it for assistants" by Mark on July 22nd, 2018

There was a time, when assistants rarely showed up. When they showed up, they might be half an hour outside the classroom, making private calls. Today, I wished I had a TA. Why not a student from a university?

A special needs class, only boys. Naughty, unruly and noisy as some prisoners banging some metal objects on prison bars in movies (using bottles and rulers). Well, some autistic boy had a mental breakdown and screamed like the victim of medeaval torture, encountering white hot iron. SCARY. - - - I wished there had been a TA! The homeroom teacher's comment afterwards was "don't worry" (be happy, as in the song)?!?

Aren't there standards regarding the number of teachers and their qualifications? The kids' parents seem to have money as the classroom has air-con. Can it be that the school wants to get rid of foreigners who are given special needs classes? Just wondering and feeling bemused.

Chris


The Thai baht is not high or overvalued

The Thai baht is not high or overvalued

" Increased costs across the board are hitting many retirees in Thailand where it hurts, as is the high baht......"

It really is time we got away from the delusion that, somehow, the Thai baht is "high" or "overvalued". It's NOT.

As Westerners, many of us seem to have an ingrained sense of superiority that extends far beyond the usual - education, worldliness, earning power etc - to the status of our home currencies. The 2008 financial crisis was a game-changer; global central banks deliberately debased their currencies (which were already overvalued anyway) with ultra-expansionary monetary policies. THAT is why GBP, EUR, CAD. AUD, SEK etc are worth less against the baht.

This situation isn't irreversible but it's going to take more than a few impecunious pensioners leaving for destinations with cheaper living standards to prompt the Thai central bank to emulate its Western counterparts by debasing the baht.

My advice would be to hope and pray that the next economic catastrophe strikes in Asia before it erupts in the West; then convert as much as you can while the baht is depressed. If it happens the other way around, all bets are off.

Chok dee

Ray


Teachers walk a razor's edge

Most teachers are working in Thailand illegally. The reason for this is simple - most agents or schools don't provide costly work permits. A school justifies it by saying an agent should provide the work permit and the agent justifies it by saying the school should provide the work permit . Meanwhile it is the foreign teacher at risk. Does the school or agent care? Actually schools and agents are hoping a teacher lasts only one year because they can have a fresh face the following year. Besides having a teacher with years of experience is not important but having a handsome or beautiful teacher is because of selfies.

One more thing, Thai teachers usually give "the foreigner" all the shifts they themselves don't want during the day. That's why the newcomer usually works the early morning and late afternoon classes. My advice is to smile more and say yes to everyone. Be humble and do other people's jobs. Be thankful you get to work with people who smile at you but dislike all foreigners. If you understand the Thai language, laugh as much as you can when you are the butt of most jokes. And remember if you don't like it you can always go back home. There will be another young newbie to take your place.

john doe


Showing 10 Postbox letters interviews out of 589 total

Page 3 of 59



Featured Jobs

Full-time NES English Teachers

฿40,000+ / month

Bangkok


English Conversation Teachers

฿35,000+ / month

Nong Bua Lam Phu


NES Teachers for Primary Level

฿50,000+ / month

Bangkok


Aquatics Manager

฿70,000+ / month

Bangkok


English Teachers for Adults / Kids

฿105,000+ / month

China


NES Children's Teacher for Saturdays

฿700+ / hour

Nonthaburi


Featured Teachers

  • Anna


    Filipino, 27 years old. Currently living in Thailand

  • Cindy


    Filipino, 32 years old. Currently living in Philippines

  • Jose


    Spanish, 47 years old. Currently living in Thailand

  • Kennie


    Filipino, 30 years old. Currently living in Philippines

  • Benjamyn


    Australian, 40 years old. Currently living in Vietnam

  • Angelica


    Filipino, 26 years old. Currently living in Philippines

The Hot Spot


Teacher mistakes

Teacher mistakes

What are the most common mistakes that teachers make when they are about to embark on a teaching career in Thailand? We've got them all covered.


Contributions welcome

Contributions welcome

If you like visiting ajarn.com and reading the content, why not get involved yourself and keep us up to date?


The dreaded demo

The dreaded demo

Many schools ask for demo lessons before they hire. What should you the teacher be aware of?


Need Thailand insurance?

Need Thailand insurance?

Have a question about health or travel insurance in Thailand? Walter van der Wal from Pacific Prime is Ajarn's resident expert.


Will I find work in Thailand?

Will I find work in Thailand?

It's one of the most common questions we get e-mailed to us. So find out exactly where you stand.


Can you hear me OK?

Can you hear me OK?

In today's modern world, the on-line interview is becoming more and more popular. How do you prepare for it?


Renting an apartment?

Renting an apartment?

Before you go pounding the streets, check out our guide and know what to look out for.